Closing

As if the body of The Letter wasn’t hard enough, just when I’d breathed the big sigh at having made it through and developed an acceptable draft, the closing leapt up, a final ring of fire through which to jump. What word or phrase should precede the signature? It seemed like a huge choice. That word or phrase gets a clear view on the page; could catch the reader’s eye straight away. So what to use?

Cheers? Sounded too much like what I say to my drinking buddies or the guy at the corner shop or any damn stranger, which my father was in a way, only he’s also related to me, so cheers didn’t seem right — somehow too distant and too comfortable. Best? As in All the Best. But doesn’t everyone get that? And didn’t I want this letter to seem more special? Love? My mother signed her first letter to me, “With love and best wishes.” I thought that might be too much? Could I actually say, “with love,” to a man I’d never met? I didn’t even know if he put his hand on my mother’s tummy and felt me kick before he walked away.

I settled on Best Wishes, signed and folded The Letter and hoped for the best.

3 responses to “Closing

  1. Pingback: Closing | Heather Marshall

  2. I like best wishes, but also believe it’s possible to love people you have never met. When I watch American TV shows, and the ‘L’ word is an issue I wonder if the character would feel more comfortable saying it to a pet dog they just met instead of the person they are dating. Anyway I chose your blog from the A-Z challenge list and am glad I stumbled across a blog post that reflects the same challenges I have when it comes to choosing the right words. Good luck with the challenge.

    • Heather Marshall

      Thanks for reading, and for commenting. I agree with your thoughts about Love. I think saying it to the dog is far less risky. It’s not so much about what we feel, but about whether we are ready to risk saying it. Glad to find you on the A-Z challenge, too. Cheers.

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